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Song of the Clyde

About the film

‘Song of the Clyde’ follows the river Clyde with music; from its upland origins, past industrial towns, and through Glasgow, to the sea.

Details

Release year
1942
Director
Jimmy Rogers
Production company
Merton Park
Screenplay
Harold Purcell
Cinematographer
Jimmy Rogers
Composer
George Posford
Editor
C. Beaumont
Sound recording
Al Rhind
Musical director
Peter Yorke
Running time (minutes)
10 mins 45 secs

Original Description

Glasgow and its River
'A film of the Clyde, from its source at Elvanfoot to its mouth at Glasgow, from rivulet to mighty waterway. Street scenes in Glasgow, shots of factories, docks and shipyards, of shipbuilding, of giant cranes, of ships loaded and unloaded. As its title suggests, the film has a notable musical accompaniment.'
(Films of Britain - British Council Film Department Catalogue - 1942-43)

Trivia

  • Many trams are seen in Glasgow in Song of the Clyde. At the time of filming, Glasgow had one of the world’s largest tram networks, and was the last city tramway in Great Britain, closing in 1962. Remarkable footage of Glasgow trams can be seen in a 1901/1902 film by the Mitchell & Kenyon film company.
  • At around the 9:30 mark, a ledger can be seen listing all the vessels that had passed that day. One of those listed is the HMS Newark, which suggests that this scene was filmed in October 1941, as that is when the HMS Newark was in the area. Tugboats seen in the film include the SS Flying Buzzard, the SS Flying Eagle, and the SS Strongbow.